Weight Loss with Increased Fullness.
Welcome ActiLean Visitor to Health Education on the Internet

Placental Abruption


 What is placental abruption?
 What is the cause?
 What are the symptoms?
 How is it diagnosed?
 How is it treated?
 How can I take care of myself?
 How can I help prevent placental abruption?

What is placental abruption?

Placental abruption means that the placenta pulls away from the wall of your uterus too early. The placenta is tissue attached to the inside of the uterus and also attached to the baby by the umbilical cord. It carries oxygen and food from your blood to the baby’s blood.

This is a rare condition. Normally the placenta separates from the uterus and is delivered right after the birth of the baby.

What is the cause?

You are at higher risk for placental abruption if you:

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms may include:

How is it diagnosed?

Your healthcare provider will ask about your symptoms and medical history and examine you. Tests may include:

How is it treated?

Sometimes the placenta starts to pull away from the uterus and then stops without treatment. As long as you and the baby are healthy, your pregnancy can continue with frequent checkups by your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider may recommend limiting your activities, including not having sex. Resting in bed for a few days may stop the bleeding.

More severe separation may require complete bed rest, and you may need to be in the hospital.

In some cases your baby may need to be delivered right away. Your healthcare provider may induce labor and deliver the baby vaginally. If the baby’s heart rate is abnormal, or if you are losing a lot of blood, you may have a C-section (an operation that delivers your baby through a cut in your belly and uterus).

A moderate to severe separation may have severe effects on you and your baby, such as:

How can I take care of myself?

How can I help prevent placental abruption?

Regular prenatal visits may help your healthcare provider detect problems ahead of time. If you have had a placental abruption and are pregnant again, be sure to tell your healthcare provider about it. Ask your provider about ways you can help lower the risk of problems during delivery.

If you smoke, drink alcohol, or use drugs, try to quit. Talk to your healthcare provider about ways to quit.

If you have diabetes or high blood pressure, follow your healthcare provider's instructions for treatment.

Keep all appointments for provider visits or tests.

healthinformatics info

References

Ananth, c. and Kinzler, W. Placental Abruption: Clinical Features and Diagnosis. Accessed June 2, 2014 from http://www.UpToDate.com.

Gibbs, R. B. Karlan, A. Haney, I. Nygaard. Danforth’s Obstetrics and Gynecology. 9th ed. Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 2008. Accessed on June 27, 2012 from http://www.ovidsp.tx.ovid.com.

Lockwood, C. Guidelines for Perinatal Care. 7th ed. AAP and ACOG. 2012.

Cunningham, F., K. Leveno, S. Bloom, J. Hauth, L. Gilstrap, K. Wenstrom. Williams Obstetrics. 22nd ed. The Mcgraw Hill Companies, Inc. 2008. Accessed March 31, 2010 from http://www.accessmedicine.com.


Related Topics

Placental Abruption

External Fetal Monitoring

Internal Fetal Monitoring

Nonreassuring Fetal Status

Nonstress Test During Pregnancy

Ultrasound Scan


divider line

Last Modified: 2014-06-03

Last Reviewed: 2014-06-03

Website Updated: October 2014

Developed by RelayHealth.
Published by RelayHealth. © 2014 RelayHealth and/or one of its affiliates. All Rights Reserved.

This content is reviewed periodically and is subject to change as new health information becomes available. The information is intended to inform and educate and is not a replacement for medical evaluation, advice, diagnosis or treatment by a healthcare professional.


divider line

Return to:

A button for the link to the top level index page for this topic area.

A button for the link to the top level home page.

Legal Notice: Use of these Health Education Materials signifies your agreement to the enclosed ("linked") terms. If you do not agree to all of these terms and conditions of use, do not use this site.

COPYRIGHT © 1996-2010 and patented technologies ((U.S. patents 6,374,274, 6,839,881, and pending patents) ) HEALTH INFORMATICS INTERNATIONAL, INC.
All Rights Reserved.